Skip to main content

About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN2 8
KQED (PBS) 8
CNBC 7
CSPAN 7
KRCB (PBS) 6
KCSM (PBS) 5
WETA 5
CNNW 4
MSNBCW 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CNN 3
FBC 3
LINKTV 3
WJZ (CBS) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 81
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)
the previous government did nothing -- [shouting] >> does the prime minister think that the announcement this week of a single tear pension will finally deal with this great injustice? >> i think honorable friend makes an important way. i think the single. pension is an excellent for. i think will have all parties support because it holds out the prospect in 2017 of having a basic state pension over 140 pounds rather than 107 pounds, taking millions of people out of the main set, giving them dignity in retirement, and particularly as he says, helping low-paid people suffer what people, and above all women who have not been able to necesrily a full pension and pass. i hope will have the support of everyone across the house. >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, kind of join the prime minister in paying tribute to sapper richard walker, 20 engineer regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and all of us have thoughts with his family and friends. i also joined the prime minister i'm passing on condolences to the family of those who lost their lives in
with the government. the group has been weakened by french, malian, an african union attacks. rebels have abandoned rocket attacks. the residents say they used them as human shields. u.s. president barack obama says he will put general john allen ford for the top nato job. tuesday he was cleared of misconduct over a series of emails he sent to a woman in florida. the accusations were made during the sex scandal that forced his former boss, general david petraeus, to resign as cia director. the u.s. defense secretary is poised to lift the ban on women serving in combat. it will open hundreds of thousands of frontline positions to females. officially, this is a major change, but on the ground, women are already involved in combat. >> since the founding of the country, it has been a core u.s. belief only straight men should fight in combat. under the obama administration, the prohibition on being openly gay was lifted. now, with little fanfare, the last restriction -- keeping women on the sidelines will be thrown out thursday. within a year, women who serve in the military -- they make up 14% of the f
in the interests of britain and not europe, and that they will no longer be blackmailed by the british government. >> we will have a look at what britt's think about this referendum later in the show. now to israeli politics, which are famous for being bolick tile. yesterday's elections certainly underlined that. p>> they were expected to triggr a lurch to the right, but the biggest gains went to a new centrist party, led by a former tv presenter. his party came second. >> the prime minister suffered the biggest losses. his right wing alliance lost almost a quarter of its seats, although it still the biggest grouping. >> netanyahu looks likely to remain prime minister, but he may have to tone down his hard- line position to build a coalition. >> the day after the election, israelis were trying to make sense of the new political landscape. many wonder if israel faces a deadlock after benjamin netanyahu lost so much ground to the left wing. while the israeli leader remains the country's political strongman, he knows he will have to engage. on wednesday, he gave his interpretation of the results. >>
labour government. >> will be prime minister join me in paying tribute to all the athletes who took part in the british -- held in my constituency? will be prime minister encourage people to register which will help us save lives of? >> i certainly could be to all those who took part in the british transplant games into the many volunteers who made these games such a success. i think gillian did a fantastic job in hosting the games. is quite right to raise this issue. they are a testament to the benefit of transplantation and i would encourage people to do as he says. >> seventy-seven of our young people with the most complex special needs face being without places next year because of government cuts. why should the most vulnerable young people in my constituency pay the price for his economic failures? >> first of all let me make the point to the honorable lady that the recent were having to make cuts is because of the mess left by her government. no one wants have to make the difficult decisions we've had to make in government, but i would argue when it comes to helping the disabled,
on rebels from the north. the government extended the state of emergency for three months as it waits for support from african troops in what could be a long conflict. there is a warning that the situation is likely to get much worse. more on that in a moment. jackie reports from monaco. >> the town -- from mali. >> after a week of heavy fighting, the rebels cleared on sunday, leaving the way for troops to take the town. >> i look all around us. we must search and search some more. there may be still a few pockets of indian resistance. >> theophylline fell into it -- theopoli fell into rebel hands. french troops were fulfilling the goals set by their president. >> our objective was to stop the terrorist offensive. malianto allow bucknthye army to win back, and they would allow it to get back territorial integrity. we know that will take more time. >> those african troops have been arriving slowly over the past few days. at the moment they can be counted in the hundreds, but they aim is to have several thousand to take over ground operations from the french. >> everyone is in agreement
already claimed victory. but exit polls suggest he'll be governing with a weaker mandate. the polls indicate that a right-wing bloc led by netanyahu's likud party will remain the largest camp in parliament. but it lost ground to an alliance of center-left parties. >> translator: thank you for giving me the chance to lead israel for the third time. our biggest challenge remains preventing iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. >> centrist party yesh atid is likely to become the second largest parliamentary force. the center-left labor party is projected to come third. the ultranationalist habayi habayit hayudi looks to secure its number of seats. the party opposes peace talks with palestinians. centrist parties have performed better than expected. some voters may have been worried by the country's tilt to the right. netanyahu is expected to begin negotiations with other parties to form a coalition. but it won't be easy. the gap between the two blocs will be narrow. >>> japanese researchers have refashioned some of the building blocks of the human body. they used cells they can reprogr
interests. >>> the japanese government has revised upward its overall assessment of the country's economy for the first time in eight months. the upgrade was due to an improvement in business sentiment stemming from a weaker yen and also higher stock prices. in the monthly report for january released wednesday the government says signs of bottoming out can be seen in some areas of the country's economic activity. that is an improvement from its previous evaluation which stated the economy was showing weakness. the government upgraded its assessment of consumer spending to steady. that is coming at car sales are picking up. the assessment for industrial output was also revise the upward. the auto sector also contributing to this. >>> let's get a check of the markets now. first taking a look at stocks and we check in first here in asia where we did see a bit of a mixed picture. some corrected moves out there after recent gains. the nikkei average underperformed other asian indices as the recent moderated after the results of the bank of japan's meeting was announced tuesday. honk done down
do you think the morsi government a's reaction will be today? is there likely to be more confrontation in the coming hours? >> i think there is. all the signs are that there is likely to be violence, but the answer is what will change -- so much has been seen right here in tahrir square. slogans been chanted, and very little is changing. from your introduction, what has got worse is there is a real split in egyptian society that has been exposed. crudely between islam on one side and liberals on the other. while there are all these protests, there is nobody, either in the authorities or opposition, who has come out with a clear vision on how to bridge that divide. it feels like the divisions have only widened. >> reflect on the situation far beyond tahrir square. if you think of the country as a whole, do you think the muslim brotherhood government still commands clear majority support? >> it might not look like it in areas like cairo or alexandria, but in the rural areas, more conservative, certainly they have the backing of the muslim brotherhood. even in the cities the
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
terrorism. on tuesday, his government sacked 5600 troops. why is it, is this such kept into what the prime minister said and what the prime minister does? >> i think the honorable gentleman as an important question and i do not deny for one second that we've had to take difficult decisions about defense spending in our country. but let me make this point. at 33 billion pounds a year we have the fourth largest defense budget anywhere in the world, and i think it is her important that we make sure we have the right scale and shape of our forces and they have the right capabilities. that is what in the defense review we are investing in drones, special forces, investing more in key and intelligence capabilities making sure that we also have the aircraft we need to make sure we have highly mobile armed forces. i am incredibly proud of what our armed forces do, and because we are balancing their budgets to will be better equipped for the future. >> sixty-eight years ago this sunday than not see concentration and extermination camps auschwitz was liberated. as we mark holocaust memorial day, wil
government's position on britain's role in the eu. he pledged to hold a referendum on britain's future in the eshoo if conservatives win the next election. he took questions from the british house of commons. this is 35 minutes. >> prime minister. >> question number one a, dilma, mr. speaker. -- thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the whole house will wish to draw any in paying attribute to david robert shaw. he died and queen elizabeth hospital birmingham last wednesday as a result of wounds that he sustained in afghanistan. he gave his life for the safety of the british people, and his incredibly great contribution must never be forgotten. our profound condolences are with his loved ones. this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have a further meetings today. >> i am sure the whole house and the whole country would want to associate themselves with the prime minister's comments about david robert shaw. on monday, the prime minister stated that the task for our generation was to struggle against terrorism. on
meeting had ministers from both governments working on, proposals to deepen the economic and military union. >> she says the proposals are about a deeper cooperation in economic policy with the goal a social security, employment, nd financials. >> the spirit of cooperation was exactly what the treaty of friendship was all about. >> here is a look back. >> the idyllic village near the border region has a special place in european history. and is the birthplace of the franco-german friendship. after two world wars, if you believe such a thing was possible. the unthinkable did happen. they did not have much in common. both catholic and a conservative. >> what was surprising is that the first contact in 1958 did not take place in the palace but at his private the state in a comfortable family surroundings. they spent the whole weekend of their. he treated him like a guest of the family. he did not stay in a hotel. >> he was the only politician to have been given that privilege. any mistrust between the two men evaporated. >> their relationship led to the declaration of a musical about. th
cards to work with to form a government here. one of his deputies, the deputy prime minister, frankly admitted that, in fact, they could have lost the young voters in this election and that is the main reason why they are now down a quarter from the total of the seats that they had in the outgoing. >> north korea is promising to strengthen its nuclear program after a new round of u.n. sanctions. this victory council unanimously passed a resolution in response to rocket launch -- the security council unanimously passed a resolution in response to the rocket launch in december. >> the draft resolution has been adopted unanimously. as resolution 27, 2013. >> as resolution 2087, 2013. >> the security council condemned what it described as a missilemelissposted technology and warned that for the consequences. >> today's resolution makes clear that, if north korea chooses again to defy the international community, such as by conducting of the and -- conducting another launch for a nuclear test, then the council will take significant action. >> the difference was the near- minute response fr
coalition government after benjamin netanyahu failed to win an outcry majority in tuesday's general election. the alliance ended the day with fewer seats in parliament, losing around one quarter, but remaining the largest group. the centrist party was the surprise of the night. katya? >> benjamin netanyahu certainly got a bloody nose in those elections yesterday, his pre- election slogan, strong leader for strong israel, rings rather hollow. clearly many israelis did not like his leadership style, many felt he was too arrogant and out of touch and they shouted loudly for change. that will what impact the domestic policy. one out of four people in this country are living in poverty. it will also affect how they move forward on the crisis around the iranian nuclear program and the israeli palestinian crisis, whether they will move towards restarting long stalled peace talks. you can see the signal -- the city walls behind me there. the political makeup of the future coalition government will impact them and how it moves on those policies. there is a lot of wheeling and dealing that has been go
to the honorable member that the use of food banks increased 10 times under the last labour government. >> will be prime minister join me in paying tribute to all the athletes who took part in the british -- held in my constituency? will be prime minister encourage people to register which will help us save lives of? >> i certainly could be to all those who took part in the british transplant games into the many volunteers who made these games such a success. i think gillian did a fantastic job in hosting the games. is quite right to raise this issue. they are a testament to the benefit of transplantation and i would encourage people to do as he says. >> seventy-seven of our young people with the most complex special needs face being without places next year because of government cuts. why should the most vulnerable young people in my constituency pay the price for his economic failures? >> first of all let me make the point to the honorable lady that the recent were having to make cuts is because of the mess left by her government. no one wants have to make the difficult decisions we'
party into one of the most outrageous government dependent parties that we've ever seen in modern time. you have delivered less and less from our economy, particularly for hispanics and african-americans. >> dana, the stock market is at a five-time high -- a five-year high. unemployment is at a five-year low. he says on the one hand he wants to reach out. you can see the shares in the dow jones right now. what is this man talking about? please, translate it because i'm not intelligent enough to understand it. >> there is apparently a bit of a mixed message occurring at the rnc winter meeting. >> in the very brain of the chairman. >> i think bobby jindal had a point where he said we need to stop being the party of austerity. we need to stop saying how good we can be at shrinking and cutting government. that is not a winning message. he's absolutely right about that. and then you have the party here in washington doing exactly what he said not to do, and you have paul ryan coming forward and saying, yes, i'm going to -- we lost the election so i'm actually going to double down on this. i
. and it was a speech that does represent his overall view of governing. >> colby, a to f? >> strong b, not on eloquence, but in terms of laying out his agenda and what he wants to accomplish. historic in a way as well because he is the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address, and it indicates where the country is now. he laid down a marker for this, talking about equality. he covered a whole lot of ground for a lot of people. >> establishing my grading system at the outset, i give a's to lincoln's second, roosevelt's first and second, and kennedy's only. i would give obama a b, maybe b +. he was far more surefooted than he has in the past. since november 6, he has shown a far clearer sense of what he wants to do, and i think this was a communitarian address, a lot more than the individuals and we have heard in recent past. >> charles? >> i will but the tide of great inflation that has inflicted the panel. if you are a liberal, this was an a +, a declaration of a liberal future, declaration that the 30 years of conservative ascendancy that began with ronald reagan, which he stayed
in the third quarter. >> he also weighed in on the irish government's efforts to boost its economy, saying progress was being made, but insisted more could be done. >> the government has not necessarily addressed all the issues. they've done well and they've certainly addressed certain aspects of the cost space within ireland. but for those companies, particularly retailers, we're operating within the irish domestic market exclusively, it's a very, very different environment with awkward rent reviews, public sector costs are highly uncompetitive right across costs such as wages. other local authority charges on retailers in particular and those with large industrial premises within the country and we also have a domestic mortgage crisis with the banks. >> now, ryanair shares are under pressure today. you can see they're trading down by better than 2%, in fact, taking the sector down, too. ez-jet is one of the worst performers on the stoxx 600 today. ryanair is roughly flat over the past seven days, so marginally higher from where we were a week ago on the back of those comments. >>> we are
a new coalition government. >> sreenivasan: and ray suarez updates the high-powered meetings of heads of state, business leaders, and others at the world economic forum in davos, switzerland. >> brown: from mali, lindsey hilsum looks at tensions caused by government troops as they advance into islamist territory. >> sreenivasan: spencer michels has a story about trash and one city's crusade to eliminate all of it. >> reporter: san francisco boasts that it recycles 80% of all garbage, and is aiming for zero waste. but some skeptics don' believe it. >> brown: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnee.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for
people i work for are even more tired of it than i am. a divided government is a good opportunity to make tough choices. the president will never have more political capital than he has right now. let's take those two things together. let's see what that formula would produce. divided government. republicans and democrats both have to take responsibility. a president with maximum political capital could equal a good and long-term result. i hope that the president and the majority in the senate will get serious about working together and solve the problems that we face as a county. i look forward to being part of that and i am appreciative that the house of representatives has passed legislation that appears to have forced the senate to do its job on a budget for the first time in four years. and, madam president, i'd ask unanimous consent that the period of morning business now be extended until 12:30 today and that all provisions of the previous order remain in effect. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. bro
and not the government, which is what obama believes is the demint -- the definition of the collectivity. if all that is true, and i think it is, i think that four more years are on the course of drift, on the course of expanding the government at the expense of the private-sector and will have results that will be unsustainable and there will be a shift away from it, which makes me rather optimistic about the future in the medium term, although i'm not that optimistic about the short-term. >> we will build more into the causes, the selection -- this may be a false choice, but to what extent you think the outcome had to do with romney s weaknesses as a candidate and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and the stillness of it, how much the circumstances the economy was unable to brand obama. >> the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a set -- was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the intrusiveness expansion of the pyramid. it was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and there
military. >> thank you so much for having me. >> change has already come. european governments are worried about the threat of terrorism in benghazi, libya, they are urging their citizens to leave immediately. britain, germany, and the netherlands have intelligence of a specific and imminent threat against westerners in the city a week after foreign hostages were seized and killed in algeria and four months after the u.s. ambassador was killed in benghazi. no one is taking any chances. our security correspondent reports. >> and other terrorist threat in north africa. the foreign office told all britons in benghazi to leave immediately because of a specific and imminent danger. >> this is a turbulent part of north africa and the whole of the region, north africa is an area where various militant groups organize. want to prevent that threat but we have got to put the safety of british citizens first. >> libyan officials say the warning to them by surprise. >> this announcement hints at something that is not exist on the ground. this is not justified enough in our opinion. >> only a few month
of governing. >> colby, a to f? >> strong b, not so much on the eloquence, but on laying out his agenda and what he wants to accomplish. historic in a way as well. he is the first president to use the word "gay" in an inaugural address, and i think that is where the country is heading. he laid down a marker for this when he talked abut equality. >> mark? >> establishing my grading system at the outset, i give a's second,ln, roosevelt's and kennedy paused only. i would give obama a b, a bb- plus. he was far more surefooted than had been in the past. since the member 6 he has shown a far clearer sense of what he wants to do. i think this was a communitarian address, a lot more than the individualism and we have heard in recent past. >> charles? >> i will buck the tide of grade inflation that has infected the panel. if you are a liberal, this was an a plus, a declaration of a liberal future. declaration that 30 years of conservative ascendancy that began with a ragged's inaugural where he stated in a minute and a half, government is not the solution, but is the problem, this was an overtur
governments on the other side of the continent. we're for starting duties at some demonstrations of athens, madrid and rome. restarting casein in berlin, helsinki and the hague and of course were saying this frustration with the e.u. vary dramatically here in the united kingdom. europe's leaders have a duty to hear these concerns. indeed we have a duty to act on them and not just to fix the problems in the euro zone, but if in any emergency should plan for the amount as well as dealing with the present crisis center in the midst of present challenges we should plan for the future and what the world will look like when difficulties in the euro zone have been overcome. the biggest danger to the european union comes not from those who advocate change, but those who denounce new thinking is heresy. in its long history, europe has experienced heretics that turned out to have point. my point is this. for the same will not secure long-term future for the euro zone. more of the sample not fit the european union keeping pace with the new powerhouse economies. more of the same will not ring the euro
employees will face furloughs and reduced paychecks by april. the government of syria called today for thousands of refugees to come home, including those opposed to the regime. nearly 600,000 syrians have fled the civil war and gone to neighboring countries. there's been a new surge this week. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of independent television news. >> the children say they double-checked their figures. they counted around 10,000 children in the overcrowded camps in jordan in just the past 24 hours, with the parents or gardens they recognized around 20,000 people in all. with the winter cold and conditions like this, in the camps, king abdullah of jordan took the might of these people to the top today, to the world economic summit in davous. >> jordan is hosting almost 300,000. the weakest ref gos are struggling now just to survive this year's harsh winter. more international support is desperately needed. and it's only going to get worse. >> back there syria it is indeed getting worse. these people filmed getting out and leaving in the past 24 hours. it's partly
called on france and the malian government to end their offensive to open the way for talks. the conflict has been going on for a year now. the situation is complex with a tuareg rebellion, an army coup, and an islamist uprising. and many are hoping that the french-led intervention will end the crisis. we met members of the community living here in berlin. and she goes to work, just another winter day in berlin, but her thoughts are with her relatives some 4,000 kilometers away. her family had to flee the north of the country. she talks to them on the phone almost every day. >> i think that if it was not for french intervention, the islamists would be in the capital. i could sense the relief when i spoke to my family on the phone. they were living in incredible fear until the french arrived. it was really bad. >> marcel experienced this terror on the ground. he was visiting timbuktu in early 2012 with the islamists arrived. >> these four or five days that i spent there after the coup -- that was the worst time. also in terms of my personal experiences with people. and then, there's what r
happy about that. so the primary issue had to do with the organization and the polish government and who would be in the government. in the agreements were as loose as could possibly be. stalin was supposed to reorganize the government. and of of course, he of here this early, the only thing he cared about was protecting its borders. he didn't care about the u.n. he didn't care about reparations, and that was not his primary concern. his primary concern was territorial protections security forces country. so they went back and forth on that. the hopkins got nowhere on the issue of the polish government issue of the polish government and they had arrested 16 polish underground people. everybody said that hopkins have done miracles. but they never saw a result of the polish problem. unlike truman, roosevelt was not backed into a corner and the getting into shouting matches. roosevelt never would've done that. not a lot they suspect it still would've gone away, but it just would've taken longer. george cain said to hopkins before he went in to talk to stone, he said, essentially, don't try
last night. plus, the world economic forum, the most powerful names in business and government gathering in davos, switzerland. wednesday, january 23, 2013. and "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ >>> welcome to "squawk box" on cnbc, i'm becky quick with ross westgate. andrew is reporting from switzerland. that's why we've got the mountain music. we'll get to andrew in a moment. first, the top stories. the common theme here quarterly results, shares of google getting a boost. earnings and revenue topping consensus and perhaps more important metrics, revenue from google's core internet business. it outpaced many analysts' expectations. advertising rates fell less than in proves periods. as you see, the stock was up -- this morning up almost 5% in the premarket. ibm shares jumping after the bell. earnings and revenue beating the street, as well. the world's largest technology services company offering a better than expected outlook for 2013. that stock, as you see, up by 4% in the premarket. also, we had advanced microdevices. it came in with a smaller than expected loss in the fo
damaged iran's photo nuclear facility and used to enrich uranium. the israeli government is looking at reports it trapped 200 workers inside the facility and massive structural damage. iran denies the report and says it's quote, western propaganda designed to influence upcoming nuclear negotiations. second, morsi declared a state of emergency and set a curfew for three provinces along the suez canal. violence erupted on saturday, sparked by a court conviction and death sentences for 21 people involved in the massive riot in a soccer stadium last year and left 74 dead. the guilty are from port saeed, morsi's government lost control of that city this weekend. we keep an eye on the price of oil when headlines like this break. we've got oil up this it morning, 96.56. here we go on oil. illinois, the worst credit rating of all 50 states. next, its biggest city could be getting a back door bailout from obamacare, and check out the big names that you know, all of them are in the news and we're watching them as the market opens, all of them. apple, toyota and that one on the end, cat. [ wom
, it was very different from the way he, you know, governed for the last four years or attempted to govern. he came at it from sort of a centrist, pragmatist approach, and it didn't work out so well for him a lot of the times. he faced a congress in republican hands for the last two years in the house that did not, you know, accept his agenda or pass it through the way he would like it. so i think he learned from this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some
. these are composed of experts on terrorism across government agencies and make recommendations to the deputies who assist the president's cabinet in formulating a response to crises involving terrorism. there was an attempt from the outset it seems by officials at the state department and elsewhere to downplay this as a terrorist attack against americans and it's not clear why, because these teams, and the fast team of marines from rota, spain were not sent to benghazi. as a result the f.b.i. could not enter the benghazi consulate for 24 days. that prevented them from doing crucial work on the ground in benghazi that would have helped them get to the bottom of who was responsible for this attack. >> reporter: what remaining questions do you have about the conclusions of the accountability review board, that is a committee headed by admiral mike mullen and former ambassador thomas pickering about mistakes made in benghazi. >> reporter: wong of the recommendone of the questions we have is they say they interviewed 100 witnesses and officials who were involved that night in the benghazi response, but
2008 has lent or raised $7 trillion-plus for people. all around the world, including governments, schools, cities, hospitals, small businesses, large -- that's our job. we try to do it very well. the whale mistake up there -- no customers, wasn't venal. terrible mistake, if you're a shareholder, i apologize deeply. we did have record results, life goes on. >> when i came to the industry, i was under no illusion that the industry didn't have its issues. they need to be fixed. and what we tried to do at ubs is two things. first, i think banks need a new strategy. and we embarked on a bold new strategy for ubs. the right strategy. at the same time we need to deal with the legacy. to get on top of the issues, you need to get to the bottom of things. for us, a settlement of libor was an important step in going in that direction. these things need to be on the table. taxpayers want to know about it. and transparency simply has to be there. when we found this issue going on in the bank, we completely made contact and complied with the regulators. we had a very good interaction with regu
to remember. keiko abe, nhk world, tokyo. >> seven survivors of the attack will fly home on a government plane. the bodies of the seven victims will also be on the plane. >>> survivors from other asian countries have started to return patchari raksawong has details. >> a malaysian man arrived home on wednesday afternoon. he was an employee of the engineering firm, jgc. ravi kappusany was reunited at the airport with members of his family. >> i'm happy i came back home safely, that's all. the government knows what's happening. >> in manila, four filipino survivors also returned home on wednesday from a passenger plane from algeria, via qatar. they were working at the gas plant in the algerian desert at the time of the attack. they came into the arrivals hall accompanied by a japanese employee of jgc. they looked tense and did not respond to questions from reporters. a vehicle sent by the company collected them from the airport. several asian countries suffered casualties in the attack. they include seven japanese, six filipinos and one malaysian. >>> julia gillard has called for easing of frict
. there's pressure, of course, and governments are bringing in pressure to bring drug price down. where is the balance between the two? because, you know, we want cheaper drugs that provide for patients, but what does that do for you? >> you want, of course, affo affordable drugs, but on the other hand, we need new, good drugs because there is so much on the medical need. there are still so many diseases that are not supposedly treated. plus, science its made so much progress even in the last decade that there is an opportunity to come out with better drugs. and the simple message is the pharmaceutical industry understands that there has to be a certain control on the costs that cannot bring out of control. but on the other side, if you want to continue to have new drugs, we need to get, you know, rewarded for innovation. and this is a dilemma and not really all that is well understood by government. >> drought, very low yield from around the world. >> if value is good news, it's driving people to look for things that are going to help the world. what's the outlook for that? >> well, yo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)